How To Become A Biker Chick

January 13, 2018

Being a biker chick in a man dominating world can have its challenges. However, it is one of the most exciting and thrilling adventures to date. I have never given much thought to being a biker. I grew up thinking it was for men in gangs. It was a man’s world. Being a biker is so much more than dressing up in leather and growing a bread, or in my case braiding my hair back. It is a way of life. So, why be a biker chick?

I grew up with the notion that all bikers were men. They all were old gray bearded men that wore too much leather and smelt of oil.

What does it take to be a female biker? Below, I discuss what it took for me to be up on two wheels.

Training:

As a beginner biker, you will want to take a training course. In many states, you have to have an endorsement to be legal to ride. Now, you don’t need to take a course to get endorsed, however, it is highly recommended. The training courses are designed to teach you the basics of a motorcycle and the basics of riding. A great place to start is Harley Davidson. Your local dealership should offer training.

 

Cost:

The upfront cost can be overwhelming. Here is a break down of the cost associated with riding.

Motorcycle:

Depending on your style and like. Motorcycles can range from $5,000 used -$50,000 new. If you are a new biker I recommend buying a used bike.

Insurance:

Like cars, you have to have insurance for your motorcycle. The average cost of insurance is $50-$100 a month or $300- $2000 a year.

Helmet:

This is a big purchase and a must have. Although, many states do not require helmets, why would you dare ride without one? In the short time span that I have been riding. I have seen two accidents and both incidents involved a motorcyclist not wearing a helmet. I like my face and my brain so use common sense. A price of a helmet can cost anywhere between $30-$800. This solely depends on your style and comfort. FYI: Make sure it is DOT approved.

 

Jacket/Vest:

Having a protective jacket is a good thing to have. Protective jackets come with padded shoulder, elbow, and back pads. They are also made to fit snug so they will not come off in case of an accident. These typically run about $60-$500. A leather vest which many bikers wear off and on their bikes showcase patches. A vest can cost $70-$300.

Gloves:

You need to protect your fingers as well. You can not just go to the store and pick up any type of gloves. The gloves you decide to purchase need to be fitted so you have the ability to use your fingers and hands for the brakes and throttle. Gloves can cost $15-$200.

 

Boots:

Riding in tennis shoes is a bad idea. You need a shoe that goes above the ankle for full protection. In this case boots. Boots need to have great tread at the bottom so you can have traction on the ground. There are plenty of places you can get boots to start off with that won’t empty the wallet. Boot cost about $50-$200.

 

 

Sunglasses:

Many helmets have the option of the tinted visor or built-in sunglasses. Either way, you will need some sort of sunglasses. Sunglasses not only protect your eyes from the sun and wind but from foreign objects while riding. Cost: $5-$200.

Gas:

Unlike a car, gas is pretty inexpensive. Depending on the tank size you are looking at $3-$10 to fill the tank up. My tank is a 3-gallon tank and when it is on empty it takes about $4 to fill up using supreme gas. This takes me about 125 miles.

Motorcycle:

You took your training and you ready to get out there and ride. I was told by my instructor to not wait to long to purchase as you want as much practice on the bike while the knowledge is still fresh. Motorcycles are not like purchasing a car. Of course, you can pick the color, the style, and accessories. However, there is much more to this. As a female biker you have to consider several factors:

Height:

Your height will determine the type of bike you get. I stand at 5’1”  and I tried so many different types of bikes from crotch rockets to cruisers. Most of them I could not touch the ground, not even my tiptoes. (You want a bike you can place both feet flat on the ground while sitting on the bike).

Strength:

We all want to be Wonder Women, but let’s face it these bikes are 500 -1000lbs of metal. You have to be able to control this machine at all times. Especially when you stop, and park. If you can not lift a bike off the kickstand it is too heavy, do not buy it. This is a sure fire way for you to drop your bike on the road.

Seat: Female anatomy is so different than a man’s. We can have hip problems from running to riding. The motorcycle industry is understanding this and has made small improvements for our lady parts. This makes riding more comfortable. If you are unable to customize your seat. No worries find a bike that you can sit on and that is comfortable and not too wide.

Style: There are many different bikes as there are different cars. There are cruisers, dirt bikes, sportbikes, and more. Selecting your bike will be a factor in what your objective is. If you are planning to ride long distance on your bike a cruiser is a way to go as you sit upright and the suspension is a lot smoother.

Size: The size of the bike is also important. This is different than the type of bike. The size “cc” determines how powerful your bike engine is.  The larger the cc the larger the engine. Note: If you decide to go with a small cc bike, remember you are more likely to grow out of it faster. Whereas if you get a bigger cc bike you have room to enjoy it. I started on a HD Iron 883 and went to my Honda 750. Although I downsized. My bike out does the Harley.

Ride:

You took the course, bought a bike and accessories NOW WHAT!!! It is time to ride and shine. Take your bike for a ride learn everything you need to know about it. How it feels when you turn. Take a short trip through your neighborhood where you can make turns and stops. Find an empty parking lot to practice curves and turns as well. Once you have mastered that take it on a highway that doesn’t get much traffic. From there start setting goals for long distance rides.

Riding a motorcycle takes practice and patience. If you are determined you can be up and going in no time. My first long distance ride was only 3 weeks after my training course. In 6 months I have been out of state twice been in parades and all over the state of Louisiana with no signs of stopping…So what is stopping you lady rider?

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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12 Comments on "How To Become A Biker Chick"

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enannylink1
Guest

I am so impressed on how quickly you learned how to ride 💜💜💜

Taynia A. Coleman
Guest

I love It! I just learned last year as well and I am in love!

Life with Larissa
Guest

This is awesome! I never thought about all that went into learning how to ride and choose a motorcycle. This guide is super helpful for those wanting and ready to start their journey to becoming a lady rider. I’ve personally never been on a motorcycle before. It seems terrifying to me, but I know one day I’ll have the courage to get on. And who knows? Maybe after that day, I’ll be looking to get my own!

Momma To Go
Guest

I dated a guy (LOOOONGGGG time ago) who had a bike, I loved being on it. I would love to learn how to ride!

Sylvia
Guest

Wow, now that’s a mouthful on becoming a biker chick! I was a bit surprised to read about The seat customization for ladies! Assumed all seats were the same for both genders! Lol!
I went Paragliding, scuba diving among other adrenaline activities. Who knows, i might try biking one day during a trip in Asia, maybe!
Continue to have fun riding and be safe.

Randie
Guest

I really enjoyed this. My husband rides (hasn’t in a few years since his accident), but this piece has been so nostalgic. One of his big dreams is for me to get my own motorcycle license, and this has definitely inspired me. Thank you!

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